Travel


As an enthusiastic pilot, Fred seeks out aviation museums wherever he goes, and Middle Europe was no exception.  We visited the Czech and Polish museums of flight–both located on disused airports outside of major cities, and both not on your usual tourist routes. These countries, which played prominent roles in early aviation, continue to have robust light aircraft industries building their own airframes, but using...

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Krakow, a Showcase of Culture


Posted By on Feb 11, 2015

Krakow in southern Poland was a fun place to visit.  It is often described as one of the most beautiful cities of Europe. Like Prague, it is a walkable city. Most of the city’s historic area has been turned into a pedestrian zone with rickshaws, buggies and segways. It is a tourist magnet complete with its own Hard Rock Cafe, and the city’s squares teem with buskers and mimes. Krakow is a relatively small city, with about...

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A New City of Warsaw


Posted By on Jan 22, 2015

Warsaw was totally unexpected.  We found a modern city with skyscrapers–which was rebuilt after the total devastation of the central city by the Nazis in 1944. The “Museum of the Uprising,” often called Poland’s best museum, should be seen by everyone.  It tells the story of 300,000 civilian Polish resistance fighters in occupied Poland who rose against the Nazis in August of 1944.  The spirit of the resistance...

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At first glance Prague might seem like just any modern city, but any turn in the road reveals another fairy tale castle.  The city’s history shows in its medieval churches and palaces…now converted into art museums for Gothic and Baroque masterpieces. Fred visited Prague in 1973 when the Czechs were still reeling from the Soviets’ crushing of the Prague Spring in 1968-69. Then the city was grimy and depressed....

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Our memories of working abroad defined certain places as Eastern Europe–using the old “Cold War” dividing line of Russian influence. Traveling in October of this year in the countries of Poland, Hungary and the Czech Republic, we learned that most citizens prefer to be identified as living in Middle Europe.  They are tired of being affiliated with a term that they feel is outdated and which identifies them as being...

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The Story of Rugs from Hunza


Posted By on Aug 18, 2014

Our own interest in Hunza began many years ago in Africa when we began to meet Moslem friends who were followers of the Aga Khan.  These members of the Ismaeli Shia sect are the most liberal of all Moslems, and they often spoke about their homeland in the high mountain valleys of Central Asia. The current Aga Khan has an estimated 15 million followers in more than 25 countries.  Their community supports less fortunate members in...

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